Tuesday, November 14, 2006

UPDATED BELOW - The Latest Bad News from Baghdad: Is Success Not Possible?





Reuters reports today:


Gunmen in Iraqi police uniforms rounded up as many as 100 men at a government building in central Baghdad on Tuesday, in what may be the biggest mass kidnap seen in a city becoming used to such violence.

It bore the hallmarks of sectarian militias operating under cover of the security forces, although senior officials and witnesses differed over how far minority Sunnis were the target.

Other reports place the number of the abducted up to 150. NPR reports that the nation's education minister has shut down colleges and universities, explaining that there is not enough security for the schools to function. It was unclear if this suspension was temporary or longer. But there seems to be the possibility that higher education in Iraq has been killed. The New York Times reports:

A few hours after the incident, a spokesman for the interior ministry went on national television to report that arrest warrants had been issued for five senior police commanders with responsibilities in the area.

Flashback to yesterday, when President Bush was asked by a reporter about his morning meeting with former Secretary of State James Baker and members of Baker's Iraq Study Group, which will soon be releasing a report on possible alternative strategies for the United States in Iraq. Bush said:

And so we had a really good discussion. I'm not sure what the report is going to say. I'm looking forward to seeing it. I believe this: I believe that it's important for us to succeed in Iraq, not only for our security, but for the security of the Middle East, and that I'm looking forward to interesting ideas. In the meantime, General Pete Pace is leading investigations within the Pentagon as to how to reach our goal, which is success, a government which can sustain, govern, and defend itself, and will serve as an ally in this war on terror.

But as today's horrific event shows, success may not be possible. Right now the Bush administration is supporting a Shia-dominated government in Iraq that cannot control Shia death squads. the United States has helped trained a police force that is infiltrated by various militias and riddled with officers loyal to their tribes and sects and not the government. It has trained hundreds of thousands of Iraqi troops unable and/or unwilling to fight. A month ago, the interior minister was forced to suspend an entire police brigade of 800 or so officers because it was linked to death squad activity. Was this progress (we're rooting out the bad apples) or another sign of failure (we've trained and equipped murderers)?

There is an ugly possibility the Baker commission has to confront: Iraq may be lost already--at least in the sense that the US government may not be able to stop the sectarian violence that is now the number-one problem (as opposed to violence orchestrated by anti-American jihadists). If that is the case, what recommendation could Baker come up with? More important, could Bush contend with--let alone acknowledge--such a reality?

UPDATE: Apparently, most of those kidnapped today have been released. That is a good sign, though news reports have not yet explained what happened. Still, the general chaos continues. And another sigificant development was overshadowed by this episode. Yesterday, according to the Associated Press,

The U.S. Central Command chief confronted Iraq's prime minister on Monday over how Iraqi forces would halt raging violence and signaled a possible prelude to shifts in American policy on engaging Iran and Syria.

The meeting came as sectarian attacks killed at least 90 people throughout Iraq, 46 of them showing signs of torture. The U.S. military announced the deaths of four additional American soldiers.

Army Gen. John P. Abizaid, commander of U.S. forces in the Middle East, sternly warned Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki that he must disband Shiite militias and give the United States proof that they were disarmed, according to senior Iraqi government officials with knowledge of what the two men discussed....

In their meeting, Abizaid also asked the Iraqi leader to give the U.S. military a firm timetable for when Iraq's security forces could take full control of the country, according to the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the talks.

There was nothing in this brief story about how Maliki responded or what he--or the United States--could do to stop the sectarian strife. Waiting for Maliki to figure this out hardly seems a strategy for victory.

Posted by David Corn at November 14, 2006 10:48 AM

54 comments:

capt said...

Mr. David Corn,

Is Success Not Possible?

As success is not defined it is not ever going to be possible.

What would victory look like?

Nobody can "win" an occupation, not even the USA with our trillion dollar peace dividend military.

All occupations are faced with resistance. All occupations eventually un-occupy and that is a win for the resistance.

The formula does not change one iota just because the occupation is re-labeled "the war on terror".

No, no way success is possible. We do not even know what success means.


Thanks for all of your work!


Kirk

capt said...

Lieberman won't rule out GOP caucusing



Would make change if he felt uncomfortable


WASHINGTON -- Senator Joseph I. Lieberman of Connecticut said yesterday that he will caucus with Senate Democrats in the new Congress, but he would not rule out switching to the Republican caucus if he starts to feel uncomfortable among Democrats.

[…]

He was asked about the possibility that he might switch caucuses if he became uncomfortable as Democrats sought to enforce party discipline, particularly if the GOP offered to keep him as a committee chairman and respect his seniority.

"I'm not ruling it out, but I hope I don't get to that point. And, and I must say, and with all respect to the Republicans who supported me in Connecticut, nobody ever said, 'We're doing this because we, we want you to switch over,' " he said.

"I believe that the American people are considering both major political parties to be in a kind of probation, because they're understandably angry that Washington is dominated too much by partisan political games, and not enough by problem-solving and patriotism, which means put the country and your state first," Lieberman said.


More HERE

*****end of clip*****

I think all of the DINO's should just switch. It is better than the charade they play.



capt

capt said...

Republicans Blame Election Losses On Democrats



WASHINGTON, DC—Republican officials are blaming tonight's GOP losses on Democrats, who they claim have engaged in a wide variety of "aggressive, premeditated, anti-Republican campaigns" over the past six-to-18 months. "We have evidence of a well-organized, well-funded series of operations designed specifically to undermine our message, depict our past performance in a negative light, and drive Republicans out of office," said Republican National Committee chairman Ken Mehlman, who accused an organization called the Democratic National Committee of spearheading the nationwide effort. "There are reports of television spots, print ads, even volunteers going door-to-door encouraging citizens to vote against us." Acknowledging that the "damage has already been done," Mehlman is seeking a promise from Democrats to never again engage in similar practices.

More HERE

*****end of clip*****

This time I think the GOPhers are right - it really is the Demorats fault.



capt

circular_illogic said...

When the hell is Corn going to start calling it what it is: civil war?! These manipulative word games annoy the hell out of me. "Sectarian violence" is right up there with "police action". Then there was the nightly news reporting the controversy of inmates creating Myspace pages to reach out to the world. When they did a closeup of a profile they focused right on the words "...I am a liberal, vegeterian..."

capt said...

Eye's,

Love the picture!



capt

O'Reilly said...

We win if Iraq has a central government, or even three governemnts, whose foriegn policies favor American interests.

Since a Sunni government (in the South) is more likely to favor Iran, we'd do better with a central government.

It's hard to imagine what coaltition - among the Kurds, Shia amd Sunni - could form to make the central government functional.

capt said...

David Corn absolutely shreds a Bush apologist



David Corn absolutely shreds a Bush apologist, who rambles conservative talking points, at a book event with Michael Isikoff for Hubris. at a book reading/discussion with Michael Isikoff. By the expression on the faces of audience members as well as Corn and Izikoff, it looks like the guy did not take it well but, being c-span, we don't get to see it.

My guess is that he hurried out in embarrassment, cursed his whole way home and told his wife that he showed those guys, before crying himself to sleep. But I'm only speculating.

More HERE

*****end of clip*****

3.41 short video from 10/10/06 and I had not seen this one before.

Mr. Corn makes us proud.



capt

Gerald said...

Lieberman wants the Dems to kiss his ass or he will join the Nazis. He has always been a Nazi.

Gerald said...

http://www.smirkingchimp.com/thread/2487

David B. Benson said...

As bad a things are now, it was MUCH worse on May tenth, 2087 BCE, according to today's TNYT Science Times. A tsunami at least 600 feet high...

Now who, again, did you want to send down to the beach?

Saladin said...

David, was that due to global warming? ;-)

capt said...

I WISH I was close enough to the coast to have to worry. Albuquerque is about 5,000 above sea level so it will stay dry.


capt

Gerald said...

Is Bush Clinically Insane

Gerald said...

Why I Dislike America

I do like the word HATE!

Gerald said...

Why I Dislike America

I do like the word HATE!

Gerald said...

The Mystery of Hypocrisy

Gerald said...

Unleashing the Christ Within Us

Gerald said...

I do NOT like the word HATE!

Gerald said...

While there have been a number of viable potential candidates throughout history, Jesus Christ appears to be the obvious choice. While people continue to debate whether he was man, myth or God, few would deny the wisdom and virtue of the teachings attributed to him. His popular appeal and impact on civilization are unprecedented. And one need not subscribe to organized religion or ecclesiastical zealotry to manifest the soul-nurturing principles of Christ.

Gerald said...

The Death of Empathy

Gerald said...

On Death and Democracy

David B. Benson said...

Correction: Burkle Carter in the Indian Ocean was formed by a large meteorite on May 10th, 2807 BCE.

And yes, this was a big enough event that it surely affected the weather for several years...

Gerald said...

America the Temporary

Gerald said...

All you need is love

Gerald said...

America 101

Gerald said...

Connect the dots: Neglected schools, crumbling roads, permanent environmental “dead zones,” inadequate emergency systems, understaffed hospitals, library cutbacks, the lack of affordable housing, incompetent government agencies, whether it is FEMA or state bureaucracies charged with protecting helpless children – these are characteristic features of our public sector today. Partly it’s about money; little noticed amid all the concern about growing deficits and entitlement spending is this fact – non-defense discretionary spending declined 38 percent between 1980 and 1999 as a share of Gross Domestic Product. According to economists Barry Bluestone and Bennett Harrison, federal investment in non-defense capacities, including research and education, plummeted in the 1980s – from over 2.5 percent of GDP to only 1.5 percent in the late 1990s.

A Sea Of Red Ink

The scariest thing is that this is only the beginning. America’s ship of state is floating in a sea of red ink. In an important but largely neglected report in 2002, Kent Smetters and Jagadeesh Gokhale found that our fiscal gap – the difference (in present value) between the government’s future receipts and expenditures – assuming the same net tax rates going forward, was a staggering $45 trillion dollars. This is $4 trillion more than the entire capital stock of industry ($25.9 trillion) and total market capitalization ($14.3 trillion) in 2003.

Gerald said...

Blueprint For Failure

Rub the crystal ball: In the next few decades, when the huge liabilities start coming in due to Social Security and Medicare, there may be nothing left – less than nothing left – for public needs like education, highways, disaster relief, and social services, let alone national healthcare.

Small wonder that the Wall Street investor, Pete Peterson, a life-long Republican who served as President Nixon’s Commerce Secretary, says our children’s future is being ruined by a reckless fiscal “theology.”

Theology asserts propositions that are believed whether or not they meet the test of reality. Not only do our governing elites act as if there’s no tomorrow, they behave as if there is no reality. Alas, they won’t be around to feel our grandchildren’s pain.

Gerald said...

Aristotle thought injustice resulted from pleonexia, literally, “having more.” A class of people having more than their share of the common wealth was the characteristic feature of an unjust society. Plato thought that the common good required a ratio of only 5 to 1 between the richest and poorest members of a society. Even J.P. Morgan thought bosses should only get twenty times more than their workers, at most. How quaint: In 2005 the average CEO earned 262 times what the average worker got.

As hard as it is to believe, the average real weekly wage for blue-collar workers, adjusted for rising costs of living, was about $278 a week in 2004 (in constant 1982 dollars). In 1972, it was $332 a week. That’s not a slight downward trend – it’s a significant and steady decline. So what of the panacea, economic growth – remember the rising tide that lifts all boats? What we are seeing today is closer to the old view of class struggle. A recent Goldman Sachs report says it outright: “The most important contributor to higher profit margins over the past five years has been a decline in labor’s share of national income.”

Yet in a country where the press now represents the dominant class through an unprecedented concentration of media ownership, instead of this remarkable divergence of profits and wages making news, what grabs the headlines is the triumphal surge of the stock market to old highs. At the same time, the share of Gross Domestic Product going to wages is now at the lowest point since 1947, when the government started measuring things. Those who look fondly on “market discipline” that’s been keeping wages down, ignore the deep distortions built into a system in which capital is highly organized and workers are not.

So it is that to make ends meet in the face of stagnant or declining incomes, regular Americans have gone deeper and deeper in debt – with credit card debt nearly tripling since 1989. Poor kids are dropping out of high school and college at alarming rates, the middle class and working poor have been hit hard by a housing squeeze, 45 million or more Americans – eight out of ten of them in working families – are without health insurance. “The strain on working people,” says the economist Jeffrey Madrick, “has become significant. Working families and the poor are losing ground under economic pressures that deeply affect household stability, family dynamics, social mobility, political participation, and civic life.”

The American Dream has had its heart cut out, and is on life support.

Gerald said...

The American Dream has had its heart cut out, and is on life support.

Gerald said...

Maybe My Church Leaders Have Seen the Light

Gerald said...

Let me hear a great AMEN!!!

Catholics, though traditionally Democratic voters, have been an increasingly important political constituency for the Republican Party in recent years and helped Bush win reelection in 2004. But this year, Catholics favored Democrats in the midterm elections, according to exit polling.

Gerald said...

Nazi America is the world's leading terrorist nation

Gerald said...

Chainey and Hitler Bush Are Next!

Gerald said...

Voters Have Spoken

Gerald said...

Where Is Jesus Christ in Our Lives

Gerald said...

Bush should be fired

Gerald said...

I am taking some hours off to puke

kathleen said...

More death and destruction in Iraq 650,ooo dead and counting.

While the MSM (NPR, Hardball, Fox, New York Times) evaluates, dissects, ponders, the tragedy that the Bush administration created in Iraq. The "cakewalk, noble lie, creative destruction, Clean (fucking bloody) Break" liars Ledeen, Reuel Marc Gerecht, Woolsey, Cheney, Bill Kristol, Richard Perle, David and Liv Wurmser etc. etc.) lick their psychopathic chops as they make future plans for securing the realm.


How can anyone wonder why people hate and fear our nation, especially this group of killers who lied us into Iraq. They have no regard for life unless you are an American (from a white collar background) or an Israeli.

The devil needs to add a special locked dungeon for these madmen and women. I do believe in hell, I do I do I do believe in hell.

uncledad said...

Where is Jesus Christ in our lives?
You tell me!
That's a loaded question!
Some people don't believe in J.C.

uncledad said...

2nd big question of the day!

How do we get out of Iraq?

Simple stop making excuses for Zion. Start making solutions for our world. Simple stop making small talk with religion, start solving real problems. Stop feeding the corporate beast, start feeding yourself. Stop being stupid!

uncledad said...

Simple

erling krange said...

Weather due to warm up
Winter seemed like it had arrived over most of Norway this past week, but forecasters say an abrupt change is in the works. Temperatures may soar, relatively speaking, by Friday. Isfjorden, in the county of Møre og Romsdal, was a gorgeous sight Tuesday morning, but warmer and stormy weather is due later this week. "No, there's no stable winter weather in sight," meteorologist Øyvind Johnsen told Aftenposten.no on Tuesday, despite snow flurries even along the coast. Instead, he said an "intense low-pressure system" would move in on Thursday, and that in turn would lead to much warmer weather. That's because the air in the system "has taken a long turn towards the south and has also been over the Bay of Biscay," Johnsen said. "Therefore it's quite mild."
The low-pressure system will pump the warm air northwards and warm up most all of Scandinavia. Rain is predicted over most of southern Norway, and as far north as Trøndelag and Nordland counties. In Bergen, it's already been raining for weeks. So much for ardent skiers' hopes for an early trek over cross-country trails. Temperatures in some areas, including Trafjord in Møre og Romsdal, can rise as high as 15C (almost 60F). That's unusually warm for Norway in November. Storms are likely along the coast from Vestlandet north to Troms.
Johnsen claims that wide temperature variations aren't altogether abnormal in the weeks leading up to Christmas. "But now we're nearing the end of autumn, and it is unusual for northern Norway to have temperatures over 10C," he allowed.
Aftenposten's reporter
Randi Johannessen

-------------------------

David B.
More evidence of global warming!

erling krange said...

unk food advertising halted before watershed
By Martin Hickman, Consumer Affairs Correspondent
Published: 15 November 2006
The Independent UK
A ban on television adverts for junk food has been agreed by the media regulator, Ofcom, after three years of rancour between health campaigners and the advertising industry. In a move which will have wide-ranging consequences for television channels, advertisers and the health of the nation, the board of Ofcom agreed that advertising of foods deemed officially unhealthy should be halted before a nightly watershed to protect children.
Adverts for burgers, sweets and soft drinks will now be banned from children's television in the afternoon. A ban on the adverts into the evening is likely, with the cut-off point expected to range between 7pm and 9pm.
Campaigners reacted with delight to the news, which they said was vital to prevent the country's obesity epidemic spiralling out of control. But there is likely to be bitter disappointment in the television industry, which could lose advertising worth up to £200m a year.

erling krange said...

Jamie Oliver takes aim at 'fattest nation in the world'
By David Usborne in New York
Published: 15 November 2006
The IndependentUK
Jamie Oliver, the outspoken celebrity chef and scourge of every school cook in Britain, has taken his healthy-eating message to the United States. And true to form, he is not mincing his words when it comes to American children and their particular battle with obesity. "A fat person in England isn't the same as a fat person in America," Oliver gamely asserted yesterday, taking time off from a packed schedule in New York promoting his two latest ventures - a book and a television series about cooking in Italy. Apparently unconcerned with the sensibilities of his American hosts, Oliver ploughed forth suggesting that the US should follow the example of Britain, which, on his urging, has recently banned Turkey Twizzlers and other fatty delights from school cafeterias, replacing them with healthier options.

MORE

erling krange said...

Blair presses case for solution in Palestine
Patrick Wintour, political editor
Wednesday November 15, 2006
The Guardian

Tony Blair used a one-hour video testimony to the Iraq Study Group in Washington yesterday to repeatedly press his case that a settlement of the Palestinian-Israel dispute would be the single best way of calming the chaos in Iraq. Speaking from Downing Street, he also set out what he described as a three-part plan for Iraq, including better equipment for the Iraqi army, rooting out sectarianism in the Iraqi security forces and a fairer distribution of resources by the Iraqi government, including oil revenues, among the country's provinces. No 10 said he did not discuss a timetable for withdrawal of troops or whether the Iraqi government should be set benchmarks to improve its performance. He also did not trawl over past mistakes. Mr Blair apparently asked to be invited to give testimony to the group chaired by James Baker, a former US secretary of state, aware that the inquiry is seen in Washington as the vehicle by which George Bush's Iraqi strategy will be recalibrated. Mr Blair said: "The biggest single factor in getting moderate Muslim countries to support a new Iraq would be if there was progress on Israel and Palestine, as part of the strategy for the Middle East as a whole." He said "the way to stop the radicalisation of moderate Muslim opinion is to have a positive strategy of resolving that issue" and this would also be the way to deal with Iran since it would take away their ability to exploit Muslim opinion.

MORE

erling krange said...

Commission improbable
What chance Baker's Iraq Study Group coming up with something original? Don't hold your breath
Michael Kinsley
Tuesday November 14, 2006
The Guardian

The Baker commission, aka the Iraq Study Group, is expected to report early next month, and is duly bouncing around, holding hearings and all the things that prestigious US commissions do. Appointed by Congress and co-chaired by James Baker, it's hearing from Tony Blair this week.
Ordinarily, a commission like this has two possible purposes: action or inaction. Sometimes a problem is referred to a commission so that it can recommend what everybody knows must be done, but no one has the nerve to propose. The commission can ram this policy down the politicians' allegedly unwilling throats. If it is bipartisan - and what fun is a commission that isn't bipartisan? - the commission also protects both parties against a stab in the back by the other. On the other hand, sometimes a problem is referred to a commission simply to get it off the table. Action is perceived as necessary, and the creation of a commission can be made to look like action. So which is the Baker commission? It's got elements of both. Part of the idea, certainly, was to get the politicians over the hump of the election, and give them something to say in the meanwhile. ("We desperately need new ideas and fresh thinking about Iraq, and indeed the entire Middle East. I look forward to the recommendations of the Baker commission and urge them to interpret their mandate widely and boldly.") And part of the idea is to legitimise some currently unpalatable solution. But the Baker commission may be near-unique in that there is no obvious solution waiting to be imposed. People actually hope that the greybeards will come up with something that no one has previously thought of.

MORE

erling krange said...

Turkish FM warns of 'new era of darkness' if Iraq allowed to break apart
The Associated Press
Published: November 14, 2006

ISTANBUL, Turkey: Turkey's foreign minister warned Tuesday that allowing Iraq to split apart would force its neighbors to take action and usher in "an unbelievable new era of darkness." Foreign Minister Abdullah Gul was responding to analysts' predictions that the massive scale of bloodletting between different ethnic and religious groups in Iraq following the U.S.-led overthrow of Saddam Hussein in 2003 eventually would lead to the country's division into several autonomous sections.
Turkey vehemently opposes that scenario, Gul said, and would work to keep it from becoming a reality.
"God forbid, if Iraq breaks apart in some way, an unbelievable new era of darkness will begin," he said. He said Turkey had convened several high-level diplomatic meetings to keep Iraq's neighbors from wreaking even greater havoc in the region. "Imagine if such an initiative hadn't happened, if neighboring countries had tried to break off a piece of Iraq. What condition would Iraq be in today?" he said. Gul said a breakup would cause the neighbors to abandon the relative restraint they have shown so far. Iraq's neighbors include Turkey, which fears that any division of Iraq along ethnic lines would lead Turkey's own Kurdish population to rise up in revolt; and Iran, which British Prime Minister Tony Blair said Tuesday was aiding Shiite militias responsible for much of the killing in Iraq. The other neighbors are Syria, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. Gul spoke at a parliamentary session on the Foreign Ministry's budget during which he said Kurdish separatism was "one of the most important problems and threats in front of Turkey." Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is expected to visit Turkey later this week.

--------------------------

Just another result from Bushco's
policy.

erling krange said...

Reid Pledges To Press Bush On Iraq Policy
Senator Is Elected Majority Leader
By Jonathan Weisman
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, November 15, 2006;

Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.), who was elected Senate majority leader yesterday, said last night that President Bush still has not grasped the urgent need to change course in Iraq. Reid vowed to press quickly for phased troop withdrawals, a more international approach to Iraq's problems and a rebuilding of the depleted U.S. military. In his first extensive interview since the Senate Democrats' leadership election, Reid also said members of his party will have to think big on the nation's domestic issues. That includes tackling the budget deficit with strict new rules on spending, exploring an eventual expansion of Medicare to address the uninsured, and examining an increase in tax rates on upper-income Americans. But it was on the issue of Iraq that he was most passionate. Voter anger over the war swept his party to power with the unlikely defeat of six Republican senators, he said. Democrats must respond to that anger, he added, with hearings to keep the heat on the Bush administration, and with calls for a regional Middle Eastern conference and a revitalized Iraqi reconstruction effort. To that end, he said, one of the first acts of the new Democratic Congress will be a $75 billion boost to the military budget to try to get the Army's diminished units back into combat shape.

MORE

--------------------------

Things are starting to happend.

erling krange said...

Abramoff Is to Begin Sentence Today
By Susan Schmidt
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, November 15, 2006;

Jack Abramoff, the former lobbyist blamed for a corruption scandal that contributed to the Republican loss of Congress last week, is scheduled to report to federal prison today. Abramoff, 47, will begin serving a sentence of five years and 10 months at a minimum-security prison camp in Cumberland, Md., for defrauding banks of $23 million in his purchase of a Florida casino cruise line six years ago. Jack Abramoff was sentenced to more than five years in prison.
Abramoff has also pleaded guilty in Washington to fraud, tax evasion and conspiracy to bribe public officials. He is to be sentenced in that case next year, after he completes his cooperation with the Justice Department's wide-ranging investigation of his dealings with officials in Congress and executive-branch agencies. Once a powerhouse in the Republican effort to dominate K Street, Abramoff has become a symbol of lobbying greed and excess. Eight people have been convicted or have pleaded guilty in connection with his schemes, including former Ohio representative Robert W. Ney.

MORE

capt said...

Senate Democrats get tough on Iraq



Two articles in today's Washington Post show the difference the elections made when it comes to Iraq. Democrats on the Armed Services Committee, which will include Jim Webb (D-VA) after he's sworn in, already intend to be very aggressive -- starting today:

Senate Democrats impatient to start withdrawing U.S. troops from Iraq will inject a new political dynamic into the debate over the war beginning today as they question the military's top Middle East commander for the first time since their party swept into control of Congress this month.

Army Gen. John P. Abizaid, head of the U.S. Central Command, which oversees American forces in the Middle East, will face questions on the violence in Iraq and what it means for the roughly 145,000 U.S. troops there during scheduled testimony today before the Senate Armed Services Committee, senators from both parties said.

Meanwhile, the new Senate Majority Leader made it clear in an interview with the Post that Iraq is THE priority:

But it was on the issue of Iraq that he was most passionate. Voter anger over the war swept his party to power with the unlikely defeat of six Republican senators, he said. Democrats must respond to that anger, he added, with hearings to keep the heat on the Bush administration, and with calls for a regional Middle Eastern conference and a revitalized Iraqi reconstruction effort.

This quote from Reid summed up his perspective:

"Three Americans killed yesterday, four British; 150 Iraqis taken out of that building and kidnapped; 1,800-plus went through that one Baghdad morgue but that doesn't count all the dead," Reid recounted. "My displeasure with the president, he doesn't understand the urgency of this. It's all victory for him, but I don't know what that means anymore in Iraq. I do know what we are doing now doesn't work."

Bush hasn't understood the urgency. Congressional Republicans didn't hold Bush accountable. They enabled him.

This is why elections matter. Even today, two separate articles in the Washington Post outline the Democrat's aggressiveness on Iraq. It just shows the change. And, it shows that these are Democrats with power now.


More HERE

*****end of clip*****

This is music to my ears. Bring the troops home. We should have never went into Iraq, not in the way we did, not without real support from the international community.



capt

Saladin said...

Don't worry everyone, the nursery rhyme police will soon be here!

Saladin said...

Capt, I am really hoping all this talk is more than just a bunch of hot air. More kabuki theater or the real deal? Please let it be real.

capt said...

I almost hope they lie about everything else - if they would just bring the troops home.

So far, every mention of such action has been a manipulative lie and a troop INCREASE has followed.

Maybe that will change, I sure hope so.


capt

capt said...

New post and thread!

CYA there!

capt